• Dentistry

  • Just like us, pets need dental care.

    As your pet ages, they will naturally develop a layer of plaque on their teeth, which hardens to become a solid layer over the tooth called tartar. If not effectively managed, this can turn into gingivitis, an inflammation of the surrounding gums. Any inflammation and infection of the gums can have a direct effect on your pet’s heart and kidneys.

    Taking this one step further, gingivitis can, over time, lead to periodontitis, an infection around the ligament that holds the tooth in place. Your pet may experience loose teeth or tooth loss as a result.

    Both gingivitis and periodontal disease can be prevented with regular dental check ups. A simple dental check will grade your pet’s dental health from 1 (good) to 4 (urgent action required), as well as anticipate the need for cleaning, polishing, tooth extraction or even just a change in diet.

    All dental work carried out on your pet is performed in a sterile environment, with sterile instruments, which have been autoclaved to the same level of safety as human dentistry. This is to prevent the spread of Feline Aids and Canine Tracheitis.